except*/*/*/


except*/*/*/
[ɪkˈsept]
grammar word summary: Except can be: ■ a preposition: We haven't told anyone except Leslie's dad. ■ a conjunction: I'd go and see him myself, except I don't know where he lives. ■ used before a conjunction: I don't know much about the man, except that he's a fool. ■ used in the prepositional phrase except for: Everything was perfect except for the weather.
1) used for introducing the only thing, person, or fact that is not included in your main statement
All the team were there except Eddie.[/ex]
The shop is open every day, except on Sundays.[/ex]
I don't know anything except that the flight is delayed.[/ex]
She was dressed all in black except for a white scarf.[/ex]
I never get a chance to study, except when the children have gone to bed.[/ex]
He's done nothing all day except watch television.[/ex]
2) spoken
used for introducing a statement that makes what you have just said seem less true or less possible
I'd be glad to help, except that I'm going away this weekend.[/ex]

Dictionary for writing and speaking English. 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Except — Ex*cept , prep. [Originally past participle, or verb in the imperative mode.] With exclusion of; leaving or left out; excepting. [1913 Webster] God and his Son except, Created thing naught valued he nor . . . shunned. Milton. Syn: {Except},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • except — [ek sept′, iksept′] vt. [ME excepten < OFr excepter < L exceptare, to take out, except < exceptus, pp. of excipere < ex , out + capere, to take: see HAVE] to leave out or take out; make an exception of; exclude; omit vi. Now Rare to… …   English World dictionary

  • except — Ⅰ. except UK US /ɪkˈsept/ preposition (also except for) ► used to mean not including or but not : »Our offices are open Monday through Friday except on national holidays. » All money transfers, except for those between members of the same branch …   Financial and business terms

  • Except — Ex*cept , v. i. To take exception; to object; usually followed by to, sometimes by against; as, to except to a witness or his testimony. [1913 Webster] Except thou wilt except against my love. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Except — Ex*cept ([e^]k*s[e^]pt ), conj. Unless; if it be not so that. [1913 Webster] And he said, I will not let thee go, except thou bless me. Gen. xxxii. 26. [1913 Webster] But yesterday you never opened lip, Except, indeed, to drink. Tennyson. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • except — ex·cept /ik sept/ vt: to take or leave out (as from insurance coverage or a deed): exclude specifically except ed the air carriers and unions from the provisions M. A. Kelly vi: object; esp: to fi …   Law dictionary

  • Except — Ex*cept , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Excepted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Excepting}.] [L. exceptus, p. p. of excipere to take or draw out, to except; ex out + capere to take: cf. F. excepter. See {Capable}.] 1. To take or leave out (anything) from a number or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • except — [prep] other than apart from, aside from, bar, barring, besides, but, excepting, excluding, exclusive of, exempting, if not, lacking, leaving out, minus, not for, omitting, outside of, rejecting, save, saving, short of, without, with the… …   New thesaurus

  • except — late 14c., to receive, from M.Fr. excepter (12c.), from L. exceptus, pp. of excipere take out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + capere to take (see CAPABLE (Cf. capable)). Meaning to leave out is from 1510s. Related …   Etymology dictionary

  • except — ► PREPOSITION ▪ not including; other than. ► CONJUNCTION ▪ used before a statement that forms an exception to one just made. ► VERB ▪ exclude: present company excepted. ORIGIN from Latin excipere take out …   English terms dictionary

  • except — ex|cept1 W2S2 [ıkˈsept] conj, prep 1.) used to introduce the only person, thing, action, fact, or situation about which a statement is not true ▪ The office is open every day except Sundays. ▪ You can have any of the cakes except this one. except …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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